California regulators expect to ban new gas cars by 2035

California air regulators are expected to issue sweeping new rules to ban the sale of new gasoline cars by 2035. The California Air Resources Board will vote on the measure Thursday afternoon. If it passes, California would be the first state to create such a mandate. The ban would meet Governor Gavin Newsom’s goal of 100% zero-emission new cars over the next 13 years from 2020. This year, Newsom touted tens of billions of dollars in the state budget for climate initiatives, including accelerating the state’s transition to zero-emissions vehicles. (Learn more in the video player below.) The rules will set interim quotas for zero-emission vehicles, with a focus on new models. Starting with 2026 models, 35% of new cars, SUVs and small pickups sold in the state will be required to be zero-emission vehicles. The quota will reach 100% each year by 2035. It will allow 20% of zero-emission cars to be plug-in hybrids. The rules will not affect used vehicles and will allow those cars to stay on the road. The regulation, if passed, would prevent thousands of cardiopulmonary deaths and avoid nearly $13 billion in health costs from 2026 to 2040, according to the California Air Resources Board. However, not everyone is in favor of sweeping regulations. A July Public Policy Institute of California poll found that 50% of Newsome’s plans oppose Newsom’s policy to ban the sale of all new gas-powered vehicles. Read the survey results here. Video below Electric vehicles and charging dead zones in California: Why EV ownership isn’t easy for everyone KCRA 3 Investigators looked at the infrastructure for electric vehicle charging stations earlier this year. In a 2017 report, the Rocky Mountain Institute, a nonprofit organization working to accelerate the clean energy transition, cited the need for charging infrastructure to put new cars on the road. That RMI report found that California had about 300,000 electric vehicles on the road in 2017. That’s an average of 27 cars per regular charger. Buying more people into the EV market will require both cheaper cars and faster charging. In 2017, there were 196 cars per fast charger. KCRA 3 is more likely to charge a desert in Midtown, East Sacramento, Oak Park and moderate-to-low-income areas. Currently, building codes require all new homes to have electrical lines installed if the owner wants to install a charger. That does not apply to apartments. Federal funding is helping to add more electric vehicle charging stations across the country and in California. It is estimated that $383 million will be available over five years. That money will be used to put charging stations near highways, ports and train depots. | related | Here are a few ways you can find a charging station for your electric vehicle. Here’s where you can download our app.- The Associated Press contributed to this report.

California air regulators are expected to issue sweeping new rules to ban the sale of new gasoline cars by 2035.

The California Air Resources Board will vote on the measure Thursday afternoon. If it passes, California would be the first state to create such a mandate.

The ban would meet Governor Gavin Newsom’s goal of 100% zero-emission new cars over the next 13 years from 2020. This year, Newsom touted tens of billions of dollars in the state budget for climate initiatives, including accelerating the state’s transition to zero-emissions vehicles. (Learn more in the video player below.)

The rules will set interim quotas for zero-emission vehicles, with a focus on new models. Starting with 2026 models, 35% of new cars, SUVs and small pickups sold in the state will be required to be zero-emission vehicles. The quota will increase every year to reach 100% by 2035.

It will allow 20% of zero-emission cars to be plug-in hybrids. The rules will not affect used vehicles and will allow those cars to remain on the road.

According to the California Air Resources Board, if passed, this rule would prevent thousands of cardiopulmonary deaths and avoid nearly $13 billion in health care costs from 2026 to 2040.

However, not everyone is in favor of sweeping regulations.

A July Public Policy Institute of California poll found that Newsom’s policy to ban the sale of all new gas-powered vehicles had the least support of Newsom’s plans, with 50% opposing it. Read the survey results here.

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| Video below Electric Vehicles and Charging Dead Zones in California: Why EV Ownership Isn’t Easy for Everyone

The KCRA 3 Investigators looked at the infrastructure for electric vehicle charging stations earlier this year.

In a 2017 report, the Rocky Mountain Institute, a nonprofit organization working to accelerate the clean energy transition, cited the need for charging infrastructure to put new cars on the road. That RMI report found that California had about 300,000 electric vehicles on the road in 2017. That’s an average of 27 cars per regular charger. Buying more people into the EV market will require both cheaper cars and faster charging. In 2017, there were 196 cars per fast charger.

KCRA3 found that Midtown, East Sacramento, Oak Park and moderate-to-low-income areas are most likely to experience desertion charges. Currently, building codes require all new homes to have electrical lines installed if the owner wants to install a charger. That does not apply to apartments.

Federal funding is helping to add more electric vehicle charging stations across the country and in California.

It is estimated that $383 million will be available over five years. That money will be used to put charging stations near highways, ports and train depots.

| related | Here are a few ways you can find a charging station for your electric vehicle

Stay with KCRA 3 for the latest on this developing story. Here is where you can download our app.


The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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