OPD mental health co-in-charge, truck drivers rescue woman on bridge

A team that helps rescue a woman in crisis is made up of many people, including mental health experts. One video shows trucks lined up under the Interstate 680 bridge with a woman hanging out of a chain link guard. KETV NewsWatch 7 talks with a co-respondent about what convinced him to step up from the bottom while battling a mental health crisis on the front lines. Omaha police have a team of mental health co-responders who are called out in crises. They said they are working with someone every day, although it is not always as public as in this instance. , right? Because we are human. And I just try to sit there with them, you know, I try to figure out what’s really going on,” said Omaha police mental health co-respondent Kari Soto. That call last Monday “is really important, you know, Go to the scene, evaluate. Talk to the person. It’s neat because we’re not the authorities. The dynamics are very different,” said Soto. licensed mental health therapist. She said she goes on several mental health-related calls in a day.” Crises look different. And because they’re not, you know, on the edge of a building or something, their crisis is still significant,” Soto said. Her role is to find out what’s going on in a person’s life and get resources to help them. “I’ve always been interested in therapy. And I think that’s like an immediate crisis piece, it’s neat,” Soto said. The woman on the bridge eventually climbed a ladder from the top of a semi parked underneath her. When I look back on it, I feel proud. I think it was like a community effort. . So, it just comes back to people working fast and being there (for them), caring,” Soto said. Part of Soto’s job is to follow up with people in crisis moments and even weeks later. He said the number. Calls for help are growing amid the pandemic and it’s important to start having that conversation about mental health.” We all have mental health and it’s important to just be there for each other, be kind to each other, and just know that there really is There is help,” Soto said. After the woman was rescued from the bridge, she was taken to the hospital. Soto said co-respondents support them to make sure they get the help they need. Call if you need help. 988, the new suicide prevention lifeline. And if you call 911, ask for a crisis intervention trained officer.

The team that helps protect women in crisis is made up of many people, including mental health experts.

One video shows trucks lined up under the Interstate 680 bridge as a woman hangs outside a chain link guard.

KETV NewsWatch 7 talks with a co-respondent about what convinced him to step up from the bottom while battling a mental health crisis on the front lines.

Omaha police have a team of mental health co-responders who are called out in crises.

They said that they are working with someone every day, although it is not always publicly as it was in this instance.

“Well, they must be really sad, right? Because we’re human. And I just try to be there with them, you know, I try to figure out what’s really going on,” said Kari Soto, a mental health associate. -Responded with Omaha Police.

She picked up the phone last Monday.

“It’s really important to, you know, go to the scene, assess. Talk to the person. It’s neat because we’re not officers. The dynamics are very different,” Soto said.

Soto is a licensed mental health therapist.

She said she goes to several mental health-related calls a day.

“Crises look different. And just because they’re not, you know, on the edge of a building or something, their crisis is still important,” Soto said.

Her role is to find out what is going on in a person’s life and get resources to help them.

“I’ve always been interested in therapy. And I think like that immediate crisis piece, it’s neat,” Soto said.

The woman on the bridge eventually climbed the ladder over the top of a semi parked beneath her.

“When I think about it, I feel proud. I think it was like a community effort. So, it goes back to people working fast and just being there (for them), caring,” Soto said.

Part of Soto’s job is to follow up with people in crisis moments and even weeks later.

She said the number of calls for help has increased amid the pandemic and stresses the need to start talking about mental health.

“We all have mental health and it’s important to be there for each other, to be kind to each other, and to know that there really is help,” Soto said.

The woman was rescued from the bridge and taken to the hospital.

Soto said co-respondents often accompany them to make sure they get the help they need.

If you need help, call 988, the new suicide prevention lifeline.

And if you call 911, ask for a crisis intervention trained officer.

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