.

Official death data suggests that older Britons with dementia could be five times more likely to die if they catch Covid, than those who don’t.

An analysis from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) found that men over 65 with dementia had a 4.7 times greater risk of dying from the virus in 2022.

Women in the same age group were 4.4 times more likely to die from Covid if they experienced amnesia.

Experts have suggested that dementia patients may be at a higher risk of contracting Covid, as they may forget to follow advice to reduce their risk of contracting it. Once infected, a weakened immune system increases their risk of severe disease.

Although the numbers are higher, they indicate a significantly lower risk of death from Covid among dementia patients than in the first year of the pandemic.

These graphs show an increased risk of death from COVID infection for people over 65 years of age with or without dementia in each year of the pandemic.  The left graph shows the results for women and the right graph for men.  The larger the horizontal bar, the greater the risk of death.  The results for 2020 (dark blue) were the highest, with the risk lower for both sexes in 2021 (blue) and 2022 (light blue).  The risk of death for people with dementia each year is recorded in the top three bars on each graph, while the results for people without the condition are recorded in the bottom three bars.  The vertical black lines on each bar represent data bands showing the upper and lower estimates from the analysis

These graphs show an increased risk of death from COVID infection for people over 65 years of age with or without dementia in each year of the pandemic. The left graph shows the results for women and the right graph for men. The larger the horizontal bar, the greater the risk of death. The results for 2020 (dark blue) were the highest, with the risk lower for both sexes in 2021 (blue) and 2022 (light blue). The risk of death for people with dementia each year is recorded in the top three bars on each graph, while the results for people without the condition are recorded in the bottom three bars. The vertical black lines on each bar represent data bands showing the upper and lower estimates from the analysis

A study conducted by researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine reveals that global dementia cases are set to nearly triple by 2050, from 57.4 million to 152.8.  However, the disease rate is expected to increase in different parts of the world.  In Western Europe, cases are only expected to rise by 75 percent, mainly due to an aging population, while in North America they are expected to double.  But the largest increase is expected to be seen in North Africa and the Middle East, where cases are expected to rise by 375 percent.  Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia

A study conducted by researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine reveals that global dementia cases are set to nearly triple by 2050, from 57.4 million to 152.8. However, the disease rate is expected to increase in different parts of the world. In Western Europe, cases are only expected to rise by 75 percent, mainly due to an aging population, while in North America they are expected to double. But the largest increase is expected to be seen in North Africa and the Middle East, where cases are expected to rise by 375 percent. Alzheimer’s disease is the leading cause of dementia

The Office for National Statistics estimated that in 2020, before Covid vaccines were rolled out to the majority of at-risk Britons, people with dementia were at seven times more likely to die from the virus.

Statisticians also did a more detailed breakdown, taking into account age, wealth and other health conditions, if people lived in a nursing home and vaccination status.

This found that men with dementia had a 2.93 times higher risk of dying than people without the condition.

For women with dementia, the increased risk was only 2.34 times higher once these factors were taken into account.

The Census Bureau also found that while Covid was a significant cause of death for people with dementia, it was not the leading cause of death for this group during the pandemic.

Instead, it was the dementia itself and the related Alzheimer’s disease.

When comparing deaths from all causes, men and women with dementia were about 3 times more likely to die in 2022 than those without the condition.

Dementia is a medical condition associated with a decline in brain function.

Common symptoms include memory loss, difficulty concentrating, confusion, agitation, and sudden mood swings.

Dementia is a progressive condition, which means it generally gets worse over time and can be difficult to detect in the early stages.

Most cases are related to either Alzheimer’s disease, which directly damages brain cells, reduces or limits blood flow to the brain which is called vascular dementia and can result from an event such as a stroke.

While it is more common in older people than dementia, it can affect young people as well.

About 1 in 14 people over the age of 65 have dementia, but this rises to 1 in 6 people over the age of 80.

Dementia itself does not kill people but the condition makes them more likely to die from a variety of conditions.

This could be because they can, especially as the disease progresses, not eat or drink which weakens their body and makes the immune system less able to fight off viruses and bacteria.

Mobility problems can also increase the risk of falls which can be dangerous for elderly Britons or leave them vulnerable to later infection.

Dementia is a growing healthcare problem both in the UK and around the world with the percentage of people living with some form of the condition rising with age.

Global dementia cases are expected to triple by 2050, from 57.4 million to 152.8 million.

While it is estimated that 850,000 people in the UK will develop dementia, this number is estimated to rise to 1 million by 2025.

By admin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *